Bite-Sized Career Development

In my day job, I manage professional development programs. And in that field the trend has moved to offering bite-sized training. Appetizers, if you will. Rather than committing someone to a full three-course meal (or more!) of training, we know adults learn best when single-tasked and focused, and in smaller chunks, particularly as we get bombarded with more and more information.

This applies really well to graduate school training too.

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Why Higher Ed Needs to Invest More in Staff Professional Development

One of the prevailing paradigms in higher ed these days is student success. Cynics decry it as a framework devoid of meaning. After all, haven’t all of us in higher ed existed to ensure student success at all times? As in: how is this “new” or advancing the field? But more narrowly constructed, many universities, colleges, and community colleges frame their missions and strategic plans around it.

Student success can mean many things. It can entail access – ensuring that education remains available to all to the degree possible. It can include breaking down scheduling and financial barriers so students are able to complete their programs and graduate to a rewarding career. And it can mean that institutions provide services for its increasingly diverse students, such as food insecure students, first generation students, etc.

But what does your higher ed institution do for career success for its staff? Anything?

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Another Thing to Think about for Grad School Reform

I think a lot about what needs to change when it comes to graduate school. I thought a lot about it before I read Leonard Cassuto’s The Graduate School Mess (which is excellent and highly recommended), but I especially have been thinking more and more about it after having read that. Cassuto makes excellent points about what’s broken, how it got to that point, and who is thinking about good ways to fix it. You don’t have to convince me that grad school needs to be reformed. It needed reform back in the day when I did it!

One of the most important points he makes is that graduate schools need to overhaul the curriculum to incorporate professional development writ large. If students are to succeed in any career path, they will need to be taught how. How to find jobs appropriate to their training, how to market their transferable skills, how to interview and succeed on the job.

That’s all true. Grad school reform is long overdue.

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Trim the Fat: Get LEAN about your Career

Sometimes you come across or use concepts at work that could just as easily apply to your career. Working for a LEAN enterprise, I can definitely tell you that LEAN is one of them.

What is LEAN? The concept comes from manufacturing (I think?) but it’s all about eliminating what isn’t needed to improve workflow and efficiency. Making things simpler, easier to understand, and faster to do, basically. At my work what it means is to streamline our standard operating procedures to the degree possible so that we can provide the highest-quality services, and continuously update and improve our processes through a feedback loop.

What do I think that has to do with career planning, though? Actually a lot.

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Top 3 Must-Have Workplace Behaviors

In career coaching, we talk alot about KSAs: knowledge, skills, and abilities. These are the traits that a job requires in order for you to do that function adequately. They’re absolutely essential to federal job applications, but you’ll see them on pretty much any job posting anywhere. And they are important, but I also consider a couple of other attributes when I’m coaching my clients. Let’s talk about workplace behaviors and habits.

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A new core curriculum for grad students

I spend a lot of time thinking about what graduate school should look like these days, and I think know I’m not alone. There’s a lot of chatter and a growing movement that is gaining momentum that graduate school curricula must evolve and adapt, not just for its own good, but to address students’ needs, to adequately prepare them for the careers that lie ahead.

No more ifs, ands, or buts. Graduate school curricula MUST require professional develoment courses.

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